The dangers of implicit racism

The problem with implicit racism is that you usually don’t know it’s there until you behave in a prejudiced manner.

 

“How  is that possible?”, you may ask.

 

It’s like those times when you get into a discussion with a sibling; and all of a sudden, it turns into an argument, and you end up angry at your brother or sister and start shouting at them. When you calm down,  you wonder how a simple discussion disintegrated into a fight. After searching your heart for some time, you realize that before the discussion, you were still angry at your sibling because they hogged the TV remote the last time you guys were watching TV and wouldn’t even let you check a channel (And they weren’t even really watching anything). So basically, during the discussion, your irritation found an outlet and let loose.

 

That’s how implicit racism works, it enters you and twists your perceptions about black people without you realizing it. Then when you interact with a black person (even if you’re black yourself),  it waits for an opportunity and comes out. Later on, you find out on Facebook that the black person you interacted with felt your behavior/words were racist. They also write an essay giving the historical and cultural reasons why they believe what you said or did was racist. And you’re sitting there thinking, “WHAT?!!!!!”

 
Learn how to find implicit racism in your life by reading my book DEALING WITH YOUR IMPLICIT RACISM (For black people and anti-racism activists). Don’t remain ignorant about this.

Ending racism starts with you

There’s this misconception that a lot of people have : Racism and racists are all out there. We never see racism as something inside of us; we think the battle is all out there in the world.

 

While yes, there is a lot of racism out there in the world, there is also implicit racism lurking inside of us, twisting our perceptions and forming our opinions.

 
In my book DEALING WITH YOUR IMPLICIT RACISM (For black people and anti-racism activists), I show you why and how the battle against racism must first start inside of us.

 

Protecting yourself from racism

As a black person, it’s important to learn how to protect yourself from internalized racism. Not only for yourself, but also so that you can teach your children how to protect themselves as well.

 

Kids can internalize racist messages at a very young age. I have heard of four year olds not wanting to be dark-skinned because they understand that the darker you are, the more discrimination you are likely to experience.

 

In my book DEALING WITH YOUR IMPLICIT RACISM (For black people and anti-racism activists), I give you the simple techniques I used to fight against internalized racism. Techniques that you can teach your children also.

 

 

Racism and fear

Fear cripples.

It can present a small situation as a huge mountain that will be difficult, if not impossible, to overcome.

 
Fear is what keeps most people from tackling the racist mindset they have. It’s not comfortable for black people to think that they themselves are racist towards Blacks. It’s not comfortable for anyone to think that they struggle with racism.

 
When you finish reading DEALING WITH YOUR IMPLICIT RACISM (For black people and anti-racism activists), you’ll be able to confidently tackle your racist mindset without fear.

 

Why most people struggle with racism

A lot of people won’t agree with the title of this post, especially since there is such a stigma around the ‘racist’. Nevertheless, the reason I believe the title of my post is because racist messages are constantly being implicitly broadcasted through the media, society, and our cultures.

 
These racist messages don’t know color, religion, or age. They have the power to influence anyone who is exposed to them.

 

Charity begins at home. So does the fight against racism.
Learn how to protect yourself, your little kids, and your teenagers in my book DEALING WITH YOUR IMPLICIT RACISM (For black people and anti-racism activists).

 

Racism and your mind

How do you fight against racism? As a black person, I know that the battle begins in our minds.

A lot of times explaining anti-black racism to white and non-black people is just not effective. How can black people advice them when Blacks themselves also exhibit anti-black behavior?

 
Let us lead this fight by example. Learn how to fight against the racism within yourself in my book DEALING WITH YOUR IMPLICIT RACISM (For black people and anti-racism activists).

 

What is implicit racism

Implicit racism is when you believe a group of people are inferior or superior, but you don’t recognize you believe this.

And that is exactly the problem with implicit racism:  you may not know it’s there until you behave in a prejudiced manner.

People’s actions reveal what is really going on in their minds.

Knowledge and choice are some of the reasons why people, especially black people, need to learn how to protect themselves from being affected by racist beliefs. Some people make bad decisions not necessarily because they are bad people, but because they don’t have the knowledge to make the right choice.

Not only so, but the thing about racism, especially implicit racism, is that it’s deceptive. It can twist things inside your mind so that someone or something will appears a certain way, when in fact they are not. Nevertheless, you will keep seeing them that way and treating them accordingly until you decide to break racism’s implicit hold on your mind.

In my book DEALING WITH YOUR IMPLICIT RACISM (For black people and anti-racism activists) I show you how implicit racism works and what choices you can make to fight against it in your mind.

Growing up racist

No one is born a racist. So then why do people have racist views about Blacks, black people included? The answer is brainwashing.

Growing up, I was taught a lot of things explicitly and implicitly. I was taught a certain version of what it meant to respect adults, what it meant for a wife to submit to her husband, the woman’s role in the kitchen, and a lot of things about God and the bible.

As I grew older, I was explicitly and implicitly exposed to others ideas about these very issues and much more. These new ideas began to challenge what I had been taught growing up. I saw that in many areas, I had just swallowed certain beliefs because I didn’t know any better, and I didn’t even know that constant exposure to some beliefs would affect my own ideas .

The same process applies to racism. We’ve all been explicitly and implicitly taught negative beliefs about black people. In my book DEALING WITH YOUR IMPLICIT RACISM (For black people and anti-racism activists), I show you how to challenge racist beliefs within yourself.